Chris Evans Speech: Be Present!

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Chris Evans Speech: Be Present!

Learn English with Chris Evans. Get inside of Chris Evans’ head in this amazing interview. Chris speaks candidly about his youth, feeling insecure and what ambition means to him. He also discusses how to control the ego keeping your mind less noisy, and most importantly, how to be present! Christopher Robert Evans is an American actor, best known for his role as Captain America in the Marvel Cinematic Universe series of films. Evans began his career with roles in television series, such as in Opposite Sex in 2000. In this speech, he also quotes: “The most effective tool I’ve adopted is just trying to stay present. When you’re in the moment, it’s not like you’ve satisfied the part of your brain that thinks in terms of time, it’s that the part of your brain that thinks in terms of time just gets quiet, kind of doesn’t exist anymore.” – Watch with big English subtitles.


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Chris Evans:

Chris Evans Quote: Be present. Don't miss right now.

“Be present. Don’t miss right now.” Chris Evans

Chris Evans – FULL TRANSCRIPT:

“Hi everyone, Chris Evans here. How you doing? I’m answering a few questions today for my dear, dear friend, Lindsey McKeon. She has a blog. She’s a wildly intelligent person, one of my favorite people. And she had a few questions for me and I’m happy to answer them for her. So, let’s dive in.

What thought process gets you through the ups and downs associated with life? What thought process? For me, it’s trying to stay present. You know, I think, Lindsey as you know, Lindsey and I met when I was 17 and we both had a very similar spiritual belief system. And mine was a little more rooted in, a little bit more of a noisy brain. You know, I had certain beliefs and desires and I wanted to be a certain type of person, but a lot of my thoughts were kind of, I guess rooted in the ego, you know. And when I say the ego, I don’t necessarily mean arrogance.

I just mean the part of your brain that says I, the thinker, and that part of your brain is very self-serving and it’s very, it lives in a world of comparisons and time, and none of these things are helpful. And it just kind of would consistently take me out of a positive place. You know, the man I wanted to be, or the man I thought I should be, or, you know, thinking you know how you should be doing things or what you should be doing, but then not executing those things leaves you in this kind of spiral of disappointment. But again, all that thinking is based on time, you’re basing who you are and what you think you should be, on who you’ll be tomorrow and who you were yesterday.

So, for me, the most effective tool I’ve adopted is just trying to stay present. When you’re in the moment, it’s not like you’ve satisfied the part of your brain that thinks in terms of time, it’s that the part of your brain that thinks in terms of time just gets quiet, kind of doesn’t exist anymore. So, a lot of my old hurdles have kind of become far more manageable by just staying present. All you really have in life, I think is just now, a series of nows. And I think when you can kind of surrender to that, you can’t lose. So, for me, getting through the struggles that are associated with day-to-day life, it’s just be present. Don’t think about tomorrow. Don’t think about the next minute. Just where are you right now? Don’t miss right now, be here now. And a nice sense of calm just kind of washes over.

When did you start to think this way and where do you believe the thoughts originated from? I probably started thinking this way when I was, you know, maybe 15, 16 years old. And, they say you don’t really wake up from dreams, you wake up from nightmares. And not to say my childhood was a nightmare at all, by any means. But I certainly started to see a pattern where, whatever my struggles or challenges were at that age, if they were ever kind of met or satisfied, I started to see how the next day, my brain found new struggles and challenges to be at odds with. And you start to realize how amazingly resilient that part of your brain is, that that can just create conflict and truly be at odds with what is.

And I started to worry that no matter what happened or where I went in my life, will that always be that way. What’s preventing me from being truly happy or truly peaceful or present? What is the thing that’s creating this conflict? And you start to realize a lot of it, you know, when you take, it’s not those individual things. Well, that girl didn’t like me, or well that guy is smarter than me. That’s not it. It’s the part of your brain that is driving this machine, the I, that ego. It’s a very self-serving animal. And it lives in a world of comparison.

And a lot of Eastern philosophies, whether it’s Buddhism or Taoism, Hinduism, they all kind of share a similar awareness of that brain noise and it’s, you know, potential pitfalls. And at that age, I just kind of, that’s the one thing that just made the most sense to me. That’s the one thing that I saw as it just made sense to the treadmill that I saw myself running on. That was the one thing that I said, yeah, that’s exactly, that’s what’s going on here. This is just this brain that just, no matter what I do, it’s going to find new things, scared me and that worried me. And that’s what kind of made me want to pursue a little bit more exploration into that way of thinking.

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